» SPT News & Blog :
SPT News & Blog

Page 2 of 22
It’s summer time, so the chances that you’re out exercising in the heat and humidity are highly likely. All exercise, especially in the heat, will cause you to sweat due to your body trying to regulate its temperature. Sweat is good! As the sweat evaporates it helps cool off your body. However, during this process the body’s fluids are diminished as sweat contains electrolytes such as salt and potassium. That being said, it is important to replace the lost fluids and electrolyt...
Posted on 2019-07-11
Packing for an extreme triathlon is an intimidating but exhilarating task. You’re not only packing for a long endurance event but intense, extreme conditions. Participants need to be prepared for inclement weather and challenging course conditions. The swims are often bone chilling cold and the bike leg typically has windy or rainy conditions with significant elevation gain. Likewise, the run will have varying terrain and challenging mountain passes. I am currently packing for Alaskaman, ...
Posted on 2019-06-26
I have a steady flow of baseball and softball players who come to see me for shoulder and elbow rehab. Many of the players I see for shoulder and elbow pain exhibit unique characteristics only to the throwing athlete. Given this information and my background, I have preached arm care, throwing programs, and strength & conditioning for years to my clients. If you are reading this, I imagine you care for or have a player, patient, friend, or family member involved in baseball/softball. As some...
Posted on 2019-06-18
Triathletes often experience something called “heavy leg syndrome” when transitioning from cycling to running. There are two main reasons for this, cycling is quad dominate, while running involves a greater recruitment of the hamstring and calf muscles. Furthermore, the neural pathways used for cycling are different than those used for running. Your brain goes from telling your legs to move in a circular pattern during the cycling portion of a triathlon to supporting your full body w...
Posted on 2019-06-04
Do you remember holding your breath as a child? Or seeing a child doing so? Their faces can be comical, especially when they accompany the breath holding with crossing their eyes, widening the eyelids, and puffing of the cheeks. Breathing is one of our most basic skills. It is the first thing we do when we are born. You would think that we should know how to breathe, but many of us breathe shallow and rapid, especially during states of emergency, panic or anxiety.  When panic or anxiety oc...
Posted on 2019-05-24
Page 2 of 22

Share this page