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SPT News & Blog

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I have a steady flow of baseball and softball players who come to see me for shoulder and elbow rehab. Many of the players I see for shoulder and elbow pain exhibit unique characteristics only to the throwing athlete. Given this information and my background, I have preached arm care, throwing programs, and strength & conditioning for years to my clients. If you are reading this, I imagine you care for or have a player, patient, friend, or family member involved in baseball/softball. As some...
Posted on 2019-06-18
Triathletes often experience something called “heavy leg syndrome” when transitioning from cycling to running. There are two main reasons for this, cycling is quad dominate, while running involves a greater recruitment of the hamstring and calf muscles. Furthermore, the neural pathways used for cycling are different than those used for running. Your brain goes from telling your legs to move in a circular pattern during the cycling portion of a triathlon to supporting your full body w...
Posted on 2019-06-04
Do you remember holding your breath as a child? Or seeing a child doing so? Their faces can be comical, especially when they accompany the breath holding with crossing their eyes, widening the eyelids, and puffing of the cheeks. Breathing is one of our most basic skills. It is the first thing we do when we are born. You would think that we should know how to breathe, but many of us breathe shallow and rapid, especially during states of emergency, panic or anxiety.  When panic or anxiety oc...
Posted on 2019-05-24
Golf season is finally here and hopefully you’ve been fortunate enough to make it out on the course a couple of times. You may have noticed your offseason workouts have not been enough. The first thing you need to do to get back into the swing of things is work on your mobility to address any deficits. But what stretches should you perform and why? You have dynamic stretches and static stretches. Lets focus on dynamic to start. Dynamic stretching focuses on movement patterns requiring a C...
Posted on 2019-05-10
It’s starting to heat up outside!  It is very important to be prepared for the rising temperature. It can take up to fourteen days to get acclimated to the heat. Exercising in the heat can be very risky. Take extreme precautions to avoid any life-threatening heat related illnesses (please review the attached graphic for heat stroke symptoms and prevention tips). Always consult your physician, health care professional, and physical therapist before beginning any exercise routine. ...
Posted on 2019-05-02
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